A Horny Lesson …

Come blow your horn. (Pic courtesy of http://www.vuvuzelasouthafrica.co.za)

I learnt a very good lesson today.
The internet is international.
I knew that all along, of course, but I just hadn’t considered it when I wrote my last blog post.
It was on a World Cup-related theme. As the host country, we’re overwhelmed by World Cup fever here in South Africa, so it’s affecting pretty much everything we say and do right now.
Got your vuvuzela and your tickets yet, I asked, before going on to talk about modern English newspaper use of the plural “stadiums”, instead of “stadia”.
An obscure gynaecological condition?
“Loving your blog,” commented Simone Lively from the UK, “but what is a ‘vuvuzela’? Sounds like an obscure gynaecological condition!! ‘Oooh – My vuvuzela’s really giving me gip today….’!”
What a hoot! Which is what you’d be doing if you owned a vuvuzela because, for those who don’t know – and that’s probably most people outside South Africa – it’s basically a tuneless horn (now made from plastic but believed to have originated from the blowing of kudu horns). When many vuvuzelas are blown at the same time they sound like the buzzing of several million bees.
Officially sanctioned
And even though lots of people hate them – just as many here are fans. They’ve been “officially” sanctioned for use at the 2010 World Cup (by that “master of the universe”, Fifa’s Sepp Blatter) – and they certainly give “our” World Cup an African flavour. According to Vuvuzela South Africa,  the controversial instrument is “destined to become the icon of the 2010 World Cup”, and they’re probably right. Here’s some of what they have to say:
Blow a Vuvuzela
South African soccer fans blow the Vuvuzela at soccer matches to support their teams, to encourage the players, to show their displeasure and just to have a jorl (South African slang for have a blast). The vuvuzela has been much maligned, especially by some Europeans after the Confederations Cup who called for the banning of the vuvuzela at the 2010 World Cup. Not long after that, the Vuvuzela was banned in Austria because soccer officials believed it was dangerous – as in people attack each other with it! Bafana Bafana vs Japan
And then the South African National team, Bafana Bafana, played a friendly against Japan – and the poor Japanese team wanted to have the Vuvuzela banned – their delicate ears were also offended by “the noisy plastic trumpet”.
If you want to read more about stadiums, soccer and vuvuzelas, take a look at this popular South African blog.

The Soggies (While you’re here, don’t forget to check out The Soggies – see link, at right – the annual Word Nerds Stamp Out Gobbledegook Awards. You can even submit your own contenders.
And don’t forget to send your grammar queries to me, too, at stevieg@wordnerds.co.za and I’ll do my best to answer them.

This entry was posted by stevieg on Monday, June 7th, 2010 at 9:08 am and is filed under A Passion for Words, General . You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

Leave a Reply

Join the Club
The Soggies
Photobucket Announcing the annual Stamp out Gobbledegook Awards*, (or Soggies, as we like to call them). Send us your Soggies
Creative Commons
Follow me
Follow StevieGodson on Twitter
Look It Up
Enchantment by Guy Kawasaki
I Heart Madiba
Books & Reading Blogs - BlogCatalog Blog Directory